Battle Of Antietam Facts: What Happened At The Battle Of Antietam?

Have you heard about the Battle of Antietam? If so, you might be wondering what happened to it and how it affects the American Civil War. The details below contain the information about the Battle of Antietam and what had happened since it had started.

What Is The Battle Of Antietam?

This is also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg which has taken place on the 22nd of September 1862 at the Antietam Creek. This Antietam Creek is close to Sharpsburg, Maryland. The outcome of this battle had been significant to the future of America. In fact, it remains one of the most deadly one-day battles in the entire history of the American military troops.

The Beginning

Some sources, have stated that this battle started at dawn on the 17th of September as the fog has started to be lifted. There are names that have been mentioned during the battle such as Brigadier General John G. Walker whose units had formed the Confederate flank. On the other hand, the Confederate center and right flanks had been formed to the west part of the Antietam Greek.

On the other hand, Lee’s troops had become hungry and worn-out. Most of them got sick. They had been watching and waiting for McClellan’s Army to assemble along the east side of the creek. Moreover, the Union forces have started to reduce the number of their Confederates.

These military troops from both sides had faced-off across a thirty-acre cornfield which was owned by David Miller. The Union troops had been the first to fire from the left flank of the Confederates. The Confederate troops had fought them off in an effort to stay away from being overrun. They transformed the cornfield into a killing field. After eight hours of bloody fighting, there had been more than 15, 000 casualties.

The End

As the dark hours approached, there were many dead and wounded bodies from both troops in the Antietam battlefield. After four hours more of an intense fight with cannons and muskets, it resulted in over 23, 000 injuries and about 3, 650 soldiers dead.

The day after this bloody battle, Lee had started to move his ravaged military troops back to Virginia. On the other hand, McClellan did nothing. He allowed Lee to retreat with no resistance at all. However, President Lincoln was not pleased. He had believed that McClellan did not take the opportunity to win over the Northern Virginia Army while they had been down.